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Programming FAQ

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  1. Which programmig languages do you use?
  2. Which other languages have you tried?
  3. Which programming langauges would you love to learn?
  4. Which GUI widget kits do you use? Which one do you prefer?
  5. why don't you use Qt?
  6. Which IDEs do you use?
  7. Why do you prefer text editors over IDEs for coding?
  1. Which programmig languages do you use?

    I use C, Bash, JavaScript, PHP, Python, and occasionally, Assembly.

  2. Which other languages have you tried?

    I have tried C++, Java, Fortran, BASIC and Visual Basic (I don't like the last one).

  3. Which programming langauges would you love to learn?

    Lisp and Perl.

  4. Which GUI widget kits do you use? Which one do you prefer?

    I use GTK+, both its C binding and the Python binding (PyGObject). It's not a perfect choice, but it is the best I can find now.

  5. why don't you use Qt?

    Because it doesn't have a C binding (Qt is C++ and above).

  6. Which IDEs do you use?

    None. I use a text editor to write code and a command-line terminal to compile, run and debug it. Graphical file managers help me organize the files easily.

    Once I used to work with Geany extensively, and although I don't anymore, it is still my first preference when someone asks me to recommend an IDE for them. It is comparatively lightweight, portable, and useful.

  7. Why do you prefer text editors over IDEs for coding?

    Because they are lightweight and efficient. I don't get the idea of people installing a quarter gigabyte Eclipse and waiting minutes for it to load just to run a Hello World Java program.

    Most text editors in GNU/Linux are programmer-friendly. I prefer Gedit and nano, one for graphical console and the other for the text console. Both offer features like syntax colouring and automatic indentation, making them ideal for code editing. Some editors like GNU Emacs go one step further providing compiling, execution and debugging features (in which case they become IDEs).

    Another reason for not using IDEs is their habit of insering code by themselves. I really don't like it.

    However, if you do WYSIWYG GUI programming, you'll be needing GUI designers or IDEs. I do GUI in code, and that's how I can stick to text editors even while developing GUI applications.

    I'm not saying IDEs are a total waste. They are good for beginners and they sometimes make things faster even for experienced programmers. But don't let them make you overlook what's happening begind the scenes, or you'll fail to develop efficient and portable programs.

Last compiled on Sat, 01 Dec 2018 18:58:13 +0530


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